Ames Scale Model Cannon Last Of The Big Iron Gun’s in US History! FOR SALE…….

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THIS IS NOW BEING OFFERED FOR SALE! PLEASE INQUIRE IF YOUR INTERESTED….

This Relic is going to be for sale in the renowned sales catalog of Gary Hendershott this December! http://www.GaryHendershott.net

Pictured Above is a historical scale model Ames cannon. The relic was dragged up on a shipwreck site in Long Island Sound. The Ames Connecticut Cannon foundry was founded by the Massachusettes Ames family member Horatio Ames.

Ames made two massive test cannons at the end of the iron ordnance era, where steel was coming into play. Ames lined the barrels with a steel sleeve that made the cannon much stronger, but the big guns did not convince the US Government to purchase the inovated design for equiping US Naval ships in 1870’s. There was documents stating that Ames sent agents to Europe in a last ditch effort to sell the new design. However it failed because of the new technology of making steel cannon.

This scale model is beleived to have been one of the pieces left over that was not given to a European Naval purchasing agent. Since it is known that the ship wreck it came from was returning from Europe that sank a mile or two before the inlet of its home port. Two massive anchors and many artifacts have been found from the site with European goods for sale on the American market. Which confirms the ship had returned from Europe.

 

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Pictured above is a historical cannon that stood at a Revolutionary War Fort, named Fort Trumbull. For decades the cannon could not be identified to the original foundry, until in recent years. Documents were found, regarding the Connecticut Ames Foundry that placed steel sleeves in the iron barrels and the metal band around the barrel. Where Horatio Ames used his famous trip hammers named “Thor & Odin” to pound out this barrel bands.

What does it all boil down too? These images of the scale model and this 8-12 pounder cannon are the remnants of the “VERY LAST IRON CANNON” made in US history back in the 1870’s. Right at the time that steel, replaced iron that ended the era of cannon! The barrel bands has two five pointed stars, which is surprising to see.